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A web of anxiety: accessibility for people with anxiety and panic disorders [Part 2]

“Unethical”, “misleading” and “exploitative” are the words used by the Norwegian Consumer Council to describe the use of dark patterns and privacy-intrusive default settings by Facebook, Google and Microsoft. The council’s report, titled Deceived by Design (PDF, 3.2MB), documents the “deceptive” and “manipulative” techniques that companies use to nudge users towards disclosing as much information […]

Describing aria-describedby

Posted on Wednesday, 5 September 2018 by Scott O'Hara
7 comments on: Describing aria-describedby

A well-designed user interface (UI) should clearly identify important content and controls. Often people correlate this to using prominent visual cues to help guide individuals through a task or point them to necessary information. However, what may be visually apparent to some could be misunderstood or completely passed over by others. If someone uses assistive […]

A web of anxiety: accessibility for people with anxiety and panic disorders [Part 1]

Anyone booking a vacation has likely encountered persuasive notifications urging them to “Hurry, only 2 tickets left!” or to “Book now as 6 other people are viewing this hotel”. We’ve all fumbled to enter our credit-card details as an ominous timer counts down the number of minutes remaining to complete our transaction. The web is […]

Short note on the accessibility of styled form controls

Posted on Tuesday, 31 July 2018 by Scott O'Hara
1 comment on: Short note on the accessibility of styled form controls

Sticking with a native form control will almost always give your users a more accessible experience than trying to recreate one from scratch. Though the issue with native form controls is that they have an infamous reputation for being problematic to style. Outside of some of the HTML5 form controls, which have browser prefixed CSS […]