Accessibility: Why It’s So Important: SXSW

Posted on Sunday, 12 March 2017 by Mike Paciello

This was my first SXSW event thanks to the good folks at Capital One. Moderated by C1’s, Mark Penicook, our panel, Larry Goldberg, Kevin Kalahiki, Sarah Goelitz and I discussed the theme, “Accessibility: Why It’s So Important“. Audience participation was fantastic!

We stimulated focus about user experience for people with disabilities or, Accessible User Experience (AUX). We advocated for AUX and accessibility throughout the software / web development lifecycle; we promoted the “Think Accessibility” mindset; we emphasized the importance of supporting key accessibility initiatives, particularly the Teach Accessibility initiative. And we strongly reminded devs and designers to include people with disabilities in their design, development and testing environments.

My session slides are below:

View / download the presentation in PowerPoint format (630kb)

Here are some photos from the session.

On the Capital One stage. Mark, Sarah, Kevin and Larry listening to Mike talk about the "Think Accessibility" mindset.

Sarah, Kevin and Mike listen to Larry discussing the Teach Accessibility initiative.

Mark, Kevin, Mike and Kimberly at dinner. Picture by Larry Goldberg.

https://twitter.com/AccessibleMedia/status/840636346385518593

About Mike Paciello

Mike is the Founding Partner of The Paciello Group. He has been in the accessibility business since the mid-80's, both as a usability and accessibility engineer. In 2006, along with his friend and colleague Jim Tobias, he was appointed co-chair to the United States Federal Access Board's Telecommunications and Electronic and Information Technology Advisory Committee (TEITAC). In years past he has been involved in several well known accessibility ventures including ICADD, WAI, and WebABLE (his first official web site and start-up). Most recently, together with TVworldwide.com, he launched a new internet channel, WebABLE.tv, dedicated to building greater awareness about technology and people with disabilities.

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